Baroness Katharine of Akornebir             Goutte de Sang

Katharine of Akornebir 's SCA Awards - Offical Kingdom OP entry
Katharine of Akornebir 's SCA Resume
Katharine of Akornebir 's History
Katherine of Akornebir was born the eleventh of November, 
1503 at the family manor near Kersey, in Suffolk.  Her 
father served both Henry VII and Henry VIII, during which 
time he formed a fast friendship with Lord Carpenter from 
Kent.  They arranged the marriage of their children, Neill 
and Katherine, which took place in 1528.  Lady Katherine 
moved to the Canton of Akornebir in Northbourne Parish in 
Kent with her husband.  

The Carpenter estates in Akornebir consisted primarily of 
vast wheat and barley fields.  Although Neill was the 
second son in the family, his brother Keith, had no desire 
to oversee the family lands and chose to explore the world 
with a fleet of ships.  As this venture became quite 
successful, he turned over his interest in the lands to 
Neill.  Neill did not follow his father’s footsteps to 
court, but has remained on the lands, becoming a leading 
personage in the county.  Through Keith’s many ventures the 
family has gained many treasures, including Turkish 
carpets, copper and brassware, and jade figures.

Over the course of time they had two sons, Christopher and 
Nicolaus.  Lord Christopher is now 25 years of age and 
lives in the Barony of Three Mountains where he serves in 
the government.  Lord Nicolaus is Squire to Sir Philip de 
Mantel, living in the Barony of Madrone, seeking to join 
the Constabulary.

Lady Katherine’s father and mother believed quite 
fervently in education, not only for their sons and 
daughters but for all folk who showed an aptitude and 
interest.  Lady Katherine brought this believe with her to 
Akornebir where she allowed the children of her retainers 
and tenants, as well as village children who showed 
promise, to be educated along with her own sons.  It was 
these efforts, along with her service to the Canton and the 
Barony Wastekeep that resulted in a Grant of Arms, the 
Goutte de Sang, being bestowed on her.   Her Ladyship 
continues in her efforts to educate and improve the lives 
of those around her and in her dedication to the Canton, 
the Barony and the Kingdom.

After over 30 years of marriage, Honorable Lady Katherine 
fills her days with overseeing the home manor when her lord 
is away overseeing harvests and planting.  She continues to 
pursue knowledge in many disciplines, with a keen interest 
in the decorative arts of embroidery and illumination.  She 
is also developing a good medicinal garden and studying the 
medicinal arts.

Katherine has been fortunate to travel extensively 
throughout the east and south of England and even into 
Wales. She accompanied her brother-in-law on a trip to 
France and the Lowlands.  

Katherine’s father-in-law, Lord Carpenter, passed away 
while King Henry still sat on the throne.  Fortunately 
neither of his sons was called to court. Perhaps because of 
this her family managed to never fall out of favor during 
the turbulent ecclesiastical changes of King Henry’s and 
King Edward’s reign. It was during the first year of 
Edward’s reign that her father died.  Katherine’s family 
embraced the changes of the Henrican church and the further 
changes of Edward’s reign.  With a strong sense of self-
preservation the family has visibly followed Queen Mary’s 
change back to the Roman church, while maintaining their 
beliefs in private. 

As the manor is located on the way to the Cinque Ports, it 
has been a well used place for Protestants to discretely 
stop while fleeing into exile.  Lady Katherine relies on 
the loyalty of her retainers and the Canton to ensure this 
activity remains hidden.  At this time, the summer of 1558, 
it is rumored that the Queen is not in good health.  It is, 
of course, forbidden to speculate on the death of a 
monarch.  Despite that Katherine and many of her close 
associates have begun to look forward to the ascension of 
Elizabeth, God willing.